Futurust Devlog: Stopping the motion

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Futurust is an adventure, steampunk, point ‘n’ click game with numerous exciting puzzles in beatiful hand-made graphics.

  • Genre: adventure, point & click
  • Premiere: Q3 2018
  • Platforms: PC, mobile, PS4, Switch

I’ve got to admit that I have always loved oldschool cartoons. They had an undeniable charm that modern cartoons don’t really have anymore and their production involved very particular and clever animation techniques. It wasn’t until the computer age when the complicated animation process, which until that point had been done entirely by hand, started to simplify. I really appreciate the effort that went into making all those cartoons from the past look so amazingly beautiful. 

I wanted to try it too. That’s why Futurust is painted by hand. First off, I drew three designs for the main character. They looked similiar, but were clearly different robots. The one in the middle became the protagonist, named Rust. Why did I choose him? My daughter liked him the most and how could I refuse my little sweetheart?. First off, I drew three designs for the main character. They looked similiar, but were clearly different robots. The one in the middle became the protagonist, named Rust. Why did I choose him? My daughter liked him the most and how could I refuse my little sweetheart?

However, I wanted to go deeper and connect myself more closely to those cartoons from the past that I wholeheartedly adored. That’s why I decided animating the characters using one of the older techniques would be not only fun and entertaining, but also beneficial in giving the game a distinctive look. And because stop motion rules, at least in my mind, I wanted to make Rust’s walking cycle by hand, and frame by frame.

Then reality kicked in. Painting animation frames with my coffee-watercolor artstyle for only one walk cycle took about seven days. A bit of quick math and I calculated that I’d finish making all the assets and animations somewhere around 2040! I found myself in a quite a deadlock, but, as always, Stanislaw Lem came to the rescue! I started wondering how I could quicken the pace of my work and I did not want to resign from the stop motion animation. In the end, I compromised and connected the past with the present by digitally animating my frame paintings.

Hey, if you love old school animation like I do, please add Futurust to your wishlist to stay up to date with all upcoming announcements.

Error Games Studio

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